In Canada, Discussions, Money

Thank goodness I have money.

It has been just raining expenses lately.

Pouring, I’d say.

rain-pouring-umbrella-weather

Weathering expenses like a boss

My bank account has been getting hit like some Whack-a-mole lately.

Last month it was my car that needed new shocks and an axle.

This month it is this “Welcome Tax” from the city for the new condo.

Next month, ANOTHER big bill coming in is that my tooth needs a root canal done.

Note: My tooth doesn’t hurt to the point where it needs to be fixed NOW, but it does twinge and ache once in a while, and I want to get it done and over with.

What will it be for December? *sob*


Thousands, and thousands.. poof.

THE SILVER LINING IN ALL OF THIS?

It is times like this, I get down on my knees, bow down to the personal finance sprites, and thank my lucky stars I was rudely brought back to reality after I graduated by realizing I was paying a whackload of money in interest to service my debt.

I shook myself off and I cleared my $60,000 of debt in 18 months with this tool, which taught me the importance of money, debt and saving.

nature-zen-ray-of-sun

Yes.

I spend a lot, I waste a lot of money, and I do lots of (in hindsight), not so smart things….

….but I am so thankful like you wouldn’t believe that I am financially stable, solvent, with a completely paid for home in cash (Hellooooo $500 “rent” versus my previous $1100!!), a completely cleared car, and even more savings to boot.

I am grateful that I understand personal finance, investing my money, budgeting, debt, and I make my own choices with my eyes wide open for better or for worse.

I am not in a position where I am living paycheque to paycheque and these past few months have really seared it into my psyche.

I do not have to worry about paying bills, what I am going to eat, and to even censor myself (much) when I shop and spend money.

That feeling of financial security is priceless.

I am thankful, happy, and grateful for everything that has happened so far, all the good, and the bad.

I wouldn’t change it for a thing.

Who knows if I would be where I am today if I had made different, supposedly better decisions?

Now to pass on the knowledge and give back…

I go to a playgroup a few times a week and have kept quiet thus far, but when we do lightly touch upon the topic of money, I really, desperately want to help these mothers who say they live paycheque to paycheque and can’t seem to get ahead.

Do I say something?

I don’t want to out myself because it’ll become pretty darn obvious who I am if you are even remotely into Canadian personal finance blogs, and if you happen to clock my real-life outfits on Instagram.

Especially if I accidentally blurt out that I don’t have any debt and they know I own a home, but without saying anything like that, I have zero credibility.

I guess I could talk about my debt, but even that, would give me away. I mean, clearing $60,000 in 18 months? WTF.

Parents are going to give me the evil side eye.

Another thing holding me back is that I want to, but I also don’t because it would be exhausting, a lot of work, and they won’t appreciate it if it’s freely given.

(I know this for a fact, as I have been burned many times before. Only three people I know, have ever taken my free, friendly advice to heart and changed their ways.)

To get them to change, I need to charge them, like a nominal fee.

Or maybe I should suggest doing a personal finance seminar that people pay $5 or $10 to go to, on the days that I happen to be there chilling out while Baby Bun plays.

I’d have to obviously prepare materials ahead of time, but I could just.. free-for-all answer questions or give basic overviews.

Mulling it over right now.

I want to give back.

What do you think? Any suggestions on how I can help but not out myself?

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Sherry of Save. Spend. Splurge.

Am my own Sugar Daddy. Am a millionaire at 36 after getting out of $60K of student debt in 18 months, a little over a decade earlier, using TheBudgetingTool.com. I have worked 50% of my career (taking 1-2 year breaks), and quadrupled my income within 2 years of graduating, going from $65K to $260K with an average lifetime savings rate of 50%. I have 11 side incomes that are on track in 2020 to make me $50K - $75K. I could retire today if I wanted, but love my work-life balance as a freelancing consultant in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). I am all about balance - between time and money, and also enjoying my money. I also post daily on Instagram @saverspender.

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14 Comments

  1. Woah.

    I know this is your blog, but this is a very showy post. It’s flaunting your wealth and makes you seem presumptuous.

    Reply
    1. Sherry of Save. Spend. Splurge.

      1. It was more of a gratitude post.

      2. What do you want me to do? Pretend I don’t have anything and be a hypocrite that money doesn’t solve problems and make life easier?

      Reply
  2. Linda

    or soMoney Podcast….or any other podcast that talks about finances.
    I’m a huge fan of soMoney, which is how I heard your story :)….
    then again, if they listen, they may find out its you.

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      Oh true!!! I better keep it on the down low.

      Reply
  3. restful

    haters gonna hate. not a good idea to share that u have no mortgage when 99% of the ppl do. ppl who have a mortgage will shit all over the people who don’t unless u r retirement age. Most ppl with a regular paycheque can’t understand paying in full for the biggest life purchase of most ppl unless this is a socialite wealthy mommy group. sounds like the opposite. if ppl have a regular paycheque they THINK it’s un smart to lock it all up on your house. Only old people and self employed ppl get it out of necessity.

    Looking forward to the hear the playgroup mom’s response. maybe mommies with no income get it

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      I suppose so. But is it not motivation and frankly, the truth?

      Reply
  4. ArianaAuburn

    People don’t appreciate what is given for free. So yes you should charge them: after your book goes out, start some seminars if you want to. People who are interested will go to them, because they already have that will to change.

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      That’s what I think too. Free advice is not really taken seriously. When you pony up $$.. yeah, you’re all over that stuff.

      Reply
  5. Linda

    Hi Sherry,

    You can possibly skew your numbers a bit w/o letting the cat out the bag.
    Sometimes ppl will not take vague advise as you’ve mentioned, but want concrete answers or examples how you did it.
    You can probably give basic info and overview to see how its received. If its received well, you can continue to play it off as a hobby or use your numbers but attach it to someone else…basically lie a bit :).

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      True. 🙂 I could come up with a cover story! Good idea.

      Reply
  6. raluca

    Give them a compilation of other pf bloggers best articles? And then explain how you implement their advice in your life? Explain your strategies without mentioning your results, maybe?

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      “I really think ___ is incredible” could be a good way.

      Reply
  7. Ramona @ Personal Finance Today

    For the average wages here I earn an insane amount of money doing nothing (as they would say, since I work for 1-2 hours/day, while others slave for 8-12), this is why I don’t like to talk numbers. But I usually tell them that I really love reading about personal finance and there are few things that caught my eye. So I can give some advice as something I read, not only something I already do 🙂

    Reply
    1. save. spend. splurge.

      Good idea — reading material instead.

      Reply

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In a nutshell…

Save. Spend. Splurge.
[ wealth. style. minimalism. ]

——

MOST DEBT: cleared $60K in 18 months

MONEY: Hit $1M personal net worth At 36

NEW GOAL: $1M in invested assets

FAVOURITE DAY: payday

HATES: being late & lazy people

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——

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