In Investing, Money

My Dividend Buying Short List of Canada and U.S. Stocks

I normally.. actually, NEVER do these posts, because they are time consuming, but I have been meaning to do this since I quit my job earlier this year, but you know.. summer hit.. mental slowdown.

But I have been talking for a while about my little Dividend Project where I want about $12,000 in yearly dividend income, spread out over many stocks so that I diversify.

I don’t need the income right now, so I’ll just plow the earnings right back into buying more stock on a DRIP (Dividend Reinvestment Plan).

I am at around $7300 as of this post (2019), but after my next contract, that should bump up significantly because I’ll have about $100K to plow into this and that should pull in about an extra $3000 – $4000 in income if I assume an average of 3% – 4% as a yield.

Then after my contract, depending on how much I make, I’ll plow more money into more dividend stocks, etc etc.

Here is my short list of Canadian Stocks I am interested in buying for Dividend purposes, ranked in order.

I have been spending the past month just gathering the list, getting the stock ticker symbols, the names, and then going to Globe & Mail to pick out their 52-week Lowest and Highest price.

I just want to be prepared for what I think I might like to buy once I start my second contract, and will have free cash ready to plow into the market. I haven’t read up on any of them, but the ones highlighted in red, are ones I already own, I just might want to buy more.


If you want to copy and paste, here is the table (hope it works):

Ticker Name Low High Dividend
TRP.TO TC Energy Corporation 49.02 67.27 4.48%
NA.TO National Bank 54.37 65.39 4.21%
GSY.TO Go Easy Financial 30.42 59.81 2.20%
CAR.UN.TO Canadian Apartment REIT 43.03 54.65 2.59%
AQN.TO Algonquin Power 12.57 18.09 4.19%
CM.TO CIBC Bank 97.55 125.21 5.27%
CAE.TO CAE 22.1 36.86 1.30%
EMA Emera Corp 38.09 58.57 4.13%
CP.TO Canadian Pacific Railway 228.35 323.71 1.08%
ATD.B.TO Couche Tard 60.03 88.4 0.62%
TD.TO TD Bank 65.56 80.05 3.91%
RUS.TO Russel Metals 18.47 28.2 6.93%
STLC.TO Stelco 10.57 23.43 3.24%
RY Royal Bank 90.1 107.91 3.97%
DRG.DB.TO Dream Global REIT 11.58 16.6 4.15%
IIP.UN.TO Interrent REIT 11.26 16.22 1.85%
SU.TO Suncor Energy 35.53 52.06 3.95%
FN.TO First National Financial 25.38 37.93 5.10%
QSR.TO Restaurant Brands Intl 68.34 105.93 2.72%
FTS.TO Fortis 40.71 55.45 3.43%
SLF SunLife Financial 43.13 58.74 3.59%

Those were Canadian stocks. Here are the American ones in $US (U.S. Dollar / USD):

And the copy and paste table:

Ticker Name Low High Yield
NSRGY Nestle 78.62 114.87 1.92%
RDS.B Royal Dutch Shell 54.64 72.06 6.44%
DIS Disney 100.35 147.15 1.30%
SBUX Starbucks 54.71 99.72 1.61%
UNP Union Pacific 128.08 180.54 2.30%
MSFT Microsoft 93.96 141.68 1.35%
MCD McDonald’s 157.72 221.93 2.24%
JNJ Johnson and Johnson 121 148.99 2.93%
CSCO Cisco 40.25 58.26 2.80%
KO Coca-Cola 44.25 55.92 2.97%
PG Procter & Gamble 78.49 123.43 2.49%
EPD Enterprise Products 23.33 30.86 6.09%
LMT Lockheed Martin Corp 241.18 399.96 2.24%
HD Home Depot 158.09 235.49 2.36%
PEP Pepsico 104.53 139.18 2.83%
CMI Cummins Inc. 124.4 175.91 3.20%
V Visa 121.6 187.05 0.57%
MA Mastercard 171.89 293.69 0.48%
WMT Walmart 85.78 118.19 1.83%
BA Boeing 292.47 446.01 2.17%
NVO Novo Nordisk 41.23 53.55 1.29%
SAP SAP 94.81 140.62 1.02%
VLO Valero Energy 68.81 120.72 4.37%
STOR Store Capital 26.93 38.76 3.60%
AAPL Apple 142 233.47 1.40%
T AT&T 26.8 38.75 5.47%
SYK Strkyer Corp 144.75 223.45 0.97%
DEO Diageo PLC 131.43 176.22 2.62%
UN Unilever 52.08 63.62 2.62%
MMM 3M Company 154 219.75 3.39%
COST Costco 189.51 307.34 0.90%

FEW NOTES:

I don’t always just look at the dividend yield

I don’t want the stock to tank and to lose my capital / holdings for just a few dollars per stock, now do I?

I want stocks that will last the test of time.

I am looking at more Canadian stocks than American ones because of taxes

Withholding tax is 30%… and then I have to convert a depressed Canadian dollar up to an American one, which means I have to pay about 30% more… it sort of just piles on the cost of U.S. stocks higher and higher.

If our Canadian dollar was a bit more at par with the American one, I’d definitely buy USD and then buy some American holdings.

But for now, I’m staying closer to homegrown stocks.

I want to diversify out of banking stocks

A lot of what I own as dividend stocks are banks / financial companies. I want to NOT be so heavily concentrated in this, so I’ll be buying in other industries first.

I need to go through and make a list of all my dividend-specific stocks, and see where they fall, before deciding what to do.

I want to stay under $25,000 in each stock

Not that I am even there, but I don’t want to put in more than $10,000 – $25,000 MAX for really “stable” ones like banks into each stock. Once I ‘max’ out what I put in as capital, I am going to move on to another stock.

I don’t want to lose more than $10,000 – $25,000 per stock if it goes sideways. I am okay with losing a max of $25K but not let’s say $100K concentrated in one stock, no matter how stable it may seem.

I don’t want too many stocks to babysit

..which is why I don’t want too many little stocks. I am thinking 5-10 big blue chip companies, and then 5-10 smaller companies that I will keep an eye on to make sure they don’t go belly up.

What about you? Have you looked into this?

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Sherry of Save. Spend. Splurge.

Am my own Sugar Daddy. Am a millionaire at 36 after getting out of $60K of student debt in 18 months, a little over a decade earlier, using TheBudgetingTool.com. I have worked 50% of my career (taking 1-2 year breaks), and quadrupled my income within 2 years of graduating, going from $65K to $260K with an average lifetime savings rate of 50%. I have 11 side incomes that are on track in 2020 to make me $50K - $75K. I could retire today if I wanted, but love my work-life balance as a freelancing consultant in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). I am all about balance - between time and money, and also enjoying my money. I also post daily on Instagram @saverspender.

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