In Budget Roundups, Money

January 2021: Income Budget Roundup

THE INCOME = $27,939.12

All of the images below have been created with The Wealth Tracking & Budgeting Tool available for sale on Etsy, or at TheBudgetingTool.com where all proceeds go to charity

This is a sheet you buy ONCE and you can re-use for future years, plus it lets you store all of your historical data from previous years (super handy).

Day Job: $21,845.25

For now, not working or making any money at my day job.

Side Income: $6093.87

General January Musings for Side Income

I have stopped actively trying to make income off anything but my day job. If things happen – great, but I am not for instance, telling everyone I am available for coaching and so on.

Even so, it seems like January is a month everyone wants to start fresh & redo their finances, so I had a bump in coaching this month, even though I am doing it only via email and not with calls any longer (I do not have time for calls, I am in so many conferences that last for hours that this is draining).

My advertising and affiliate incomes are down but not terribly so.

I am also not taking any podcasts that are done over the phone — again, this is draining. I don’t have time for this and it’s my way of protecting my sanity.

 

Was $1355.82 “short” in actual side income cash this month

I also drained my funds this month because I am able to – I did a calculation of actual cash that comes into my bank accounts from side incomes to cover my bills and I only had $1319.68 come in this month in $CAD, which means I was $1355.82 “short” this month for my total expenses & the money was taken from my emergency fund.

All the rest of my side incomes were reinvested back into buying more stock, etc.

1 and 2 Blog: $1447.00

Advertising: $1253.42

Affiliate: $193.58

How do I make money off the blog?

http://www.monumetric.com/referral.php?refid=2025

I am mainly with Monumetric, an ad network and they give a pretty decent rate of pay, on par or better than other networks but you need to have 10K views to join. My referral link for them is here.

3 Money & Career Coaching: $1649.40

I am only doing coaching via emails now, I simply don’t have the time for calls any longer as my conference calls are ridiculously long and draining. I track how much time it takes to answer emails and put the balance at the end of each email to show you how much time I have left.

You can read some of the great feedback I got here, and see my rates, and some of my success stories are all listed here.

I also launched my Canadian Investing 101 Course which makes up some of the revenue there. If you’re interested, it’s $100 for the course, and you get 15 minutes as a one-on-one call with me after the presentation.

4 Books & Products: $290.93

I’ve written 6 books under my Like A Boss umbrella, and I need to start on that 7th book on how to build side income businesses but I haven’t yet because… time. I sell them on Amazon as well.

Save. Spend. Splurge. Products sold, include:

https://www.thebudgetingtool.com

(All net proceeds from The Wealth Building Tool go to charity)

5. Bank Interest = $14.24

I drained my emergency funds to around $7000 a month now, as the promotional rates are dwindling, and it’s not worth the 2% (until end of February) to keep money in a high interest savings account. I’d rather invest it, so that’s what I am doing.

6. Bank Promotions = $300

I got the CIBC promotional money this month but I cannot close the account until September, which I have made 3 notes about (leading up to, day before and day of), to CALL AND CLOSE IT so I don’t incur that pesky $4.95 fee when the promotion ends.

Easy $300 in my pocket. Who doesn’t love free* money?

*I didn’t even have to tie up any capital to get that $4.95 bank fee waived, it was part of the promotion for free bank fees for a year. I suspect it’s at trick so people think it’s free forever and then just pay the $4.95 fee without thinking. HAH. Obviously they haven’t come across money-minded cheapskates like us.

7. Cashback = $21.93

This comes from credit cards and Rakuten (cashback site).

I only got a bit of money back from Rakuten, from very minor spending. I mean, not so minor, because I spent about $2000 to get this amount, though it was mostly “fun” spending that got me this cash.

Still, money is money.

Other cashback options: Rakuten also only pays out every few months or so:

I also use credit cards to get cashback, and my main card is the Rogers World Elite Mastercard with 3% cash back on forex (foreign exchange) purchases and 1.5% cash back on everything else.

8. Dividends: $1905.43

January is usually a decent month for dividends. All of it got reinvested back into buying more stock, so this income, while possible as a side income of cash, is not probable as I don’t take it as cash.

I use discount brokerage Questrade for all my RRSP, TFSA, Margin and RESP accounts:

9. Resale = $0

I don’t have time for this. It’s the taking in of the bag, it’s the checking to see if it sold, it’s having to go to the post office. I am putting this on hold.

I do however, shop a lot on:

10. Lending = $454.94

This is what I earned, net after fees and so on, on about $12K I had invested, and remember, this is just for 1 month, not the year. My gross return is 13% but conservatively it is closer to 10% with write-offs of defaulted loans and fees.

I am starting to withdraw the actual cash from this account because my $700-ish balances are just bloody sitting there for obvious reasons:

Small businesses are not starting up.

Small businesses are just trying to cover their loans.

Things are not going well economically-speaking, so there just aren’t any loans to be made as Lending Loop is restricting who can sign up for a small business loan or not (e.g. no hospitality or food), due to the pandemic.

I will take that money and immediately reinvest it back into the market, and I withdrew $500 from the balance this month.

11. Surveys = $10

I managed to eke out a few, $10 is $10 especially on these long boring, insufferable calls.

How I make money off Swagbucks

I signed up for their email notifications, so they send me emails like: Earn 100 swagbucks in 20 minutes! and I fill those in. I also occasionally find survey sites I like, like Peanut Labs (connected to Swagbucks) and I see what’s there because their payouts are pretty good for the time spent.

  • Swagbucks: Use my referral link to get 300 Swagbucks but only once you earn another 300 Swagbucks doing surveys etc within the first month. You need only 750 swagbucks to redeem it for $10 from Paypal.

12. Other = $0

Nothing weird happened this month.

INCOME GOALS FOR THE NEXT MONTH

My income goals this year are roughly:

  • $30K side income – I am scaling back significantly from the $80K days in 2020
  • $300K total income – Is this even possible? I would need $50K in side income or overtime, and only the former is remotely doable. Maybe.

Honestly, just kind of going with the flow now.

MORE NOTES

Story of my Side Incomes

These are my main income streams for my side hustles (i.e anything that isn’t my day job). Money is money.

Every dollar counts. I have been working for a while since 2013 (even earlier) to try and get this to be a more stable, solid replacement for my living expenses so I will never have to sell my investments again to liveI lived through a horrific, scary no-working time in 2009-2010 when I was stressed AF and had to slowly sell my plunging red investments just to live.

I vowed at that point in time, to never do that to myself again, and started building up side hustles.

What’s “side income” to me?

So ANY income is considered a side hustle. No matter how little.

I may not necessarily take out all of the money when I make it (e.g. Lending or Dividends get reinvested back in), but I count everything. Also, any income that was otherwise extra including stuff I’ve won, gift cards, I include all of that as income even if it is “one-off”…

Why so many?

The average millionaire has 7 income streams, and currently I have 12 going on at any given moment – 11 side incomes and 1 main one.

NOT ALL OF THEM ARE INCOMES THAT HAPPEN EVERY MONTH!

My major sort of steady income streams are:

  1. Blog (Advertising)
  2. Blog (Affiliate)
  3. Blog (Books)
  4. Dividends
  5. Bank Interest
  6. Lending

The rest of them are one-offs, or just things I do every few months or so, like bank promotions where I may get a few hundred dollars every 3 months signing up for things. It’s not huge amounts of money, but it adds up to $600-ish to a few thousand a year.

All of this income can disappear

Honestly, I try not to rely on this. One month, people are buying or using your affiliate link, and another month, crickets. The key is just to try and get everything up at once, working hard to make them all viable sources of income so that when one lessens, another can pick up.

If you are interested, my money is parked here:

  • Tangerine: Use my Orange key { 32726976S1 } for free money (You get $50 once you deposit $250; and I get $50 too).
  • EQ Bank: Now at 2% … (I refuse to bank with LBC Digital and any of their related banks forever and ever. Read all about it here.)

…credit card extra rewards cashback savings here:

..and invested here:

…and I list my things for sale here:

Share Tweet Pin It +1

Sherry of Save. Spend. Splurge.

Am my own Sugar Daddy. Am a millionaire at 36 after getting out of $60K of student debt in 18 months, a little over a decade earlier, using TheBudgetingTool.com. I have worked 50% of my career (taking 1-2 year breaks), and quadrupled my income within 2 years of graduating, going from $65K to $260K with an average lifetime savings rate of 50%. I have 11 side incomes that are on track in 2020 to make me $50K - $75K. I could retire today if I wanted, but love my work-life balance as a freelancing consultant in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). I am all about balance - between time and money, and also enjoying my money. I also post daily on Instagram @saverspender.

You may also like

Previous PostWhat I read: The After Winter Edition 2021
Next PostSherry's #OOTD Outfit of the Day Style & Fashion Look: The Modern Office Work Look

No Comments

Leave a Reply